Eric Fischl Art Fair Paintings at Victoria Miro

4 November 2014 § Leave a comment

Eric Fischl Art Fair Paintings at Victoria MiroVisiting one of the big art fairs, such as Frieze or art Basel, it is quickly self-evident that many of those visiting are not always particularly interested in the art. Naturally many are, but around this highly moneyed core orbit the people-watchers, hangers-on and parasites in a desperate see-and-be-seen dance, different groups each with their own specific agenda.

Eric Fischl Art Fair Paintings at Victoria Miro

“The big collectors try to get in and out before anyone buys what they are after and certainly before the hoi polloi gets to look. And then you’ve got people who are just there for the social scene. So you have people texting or not paying any attention at all. It is as if the art is not there, or that they think it has no effect on them. But when you stop the moment you can see this weird world that is taking place” say Fischl

Eric Fischl Art Fair Paintings at Victoria Miro

It is this world – which he usually desperately avoids – to which Eric Fischl has most recently turned a keenly tuned eye. As a starting point he took hundreds of photographs from which he selected, before editing and manipulating in Photoshop to construct an image to ultimately translate into paint.

Eric Fischl Art Fair Paintings at Victoria Miro

As the series has grown so has the complexity of the resonances of the images, individually and in relation to each other. The paintings are a sharp social satire as much as they are a loving tribute to the world the artist knows best: the international art scene.

Eric Fischl Art Fair Paintings at Victoria Miro

A keen observer of the relationships between people, and between people and their surroundings Fischl here demonstrates his acute observation of body language and the small details that reflect social relationships. Art fairs are notoriously busy, and these paintings give a sense of the energy and bustle as visitors move amongst the stands, apparently giving as much attention to each other – and to their mobile phones – as to the artworks on display.

Art Fair Paintings at Victoria Miro

Fischl has described this effect: “The space in these paintings is collapsed, cluttered, irrational and aggressive. Those depicted in the scenes seem oblivious to the mania of their condition. What I’ve discovered as I moved into this work is the essentially abstract nature of the art fair spaces. They are nearly cubistic in their flatness and their jarring collaged constructions. Layers of consciousness on top of layers of cross-purposes.”.

Wangechi Mutu Victoria Miro

Also on show in Victoria Miro’s downstairs gallery are new works from the excellent Wangechi Mutu.

For more information on bothe exhibitions visit http://www.victoria-miro.com/exhibitions/current

Saatchi Painted Faces Showdown at the Griffin Gallery

18 December 2013 § Leave a comment

Following on from the Griffin Art Prize 2013 Exhibition – which is now on the road around the South of England for a few months (see post) – the Griffin Gallery are transferring Saatchi’s Showdown from the virtual online world in to reality.

Miguel Laino

The winner of the prize has been announced as Miguel Laino for his simple but expressive small oil painting shown here, winning over a very high quality – and truly international – final ten. The remaining finalists were: Chris Stevens, Casper Verborg (illustrated middle left), Stephane Villafane, Kristina Alisauskaite (middle right), Sergey Dyomin, Fiona Maclean, Minas Halaj, Maurice Sapiro, Daniel Gonzalez Coves (bottom).

Saatchi online Griffin Gallery

Painted Faces is one phase of a continuing Saatchi Online competition that provides artists from anywhere in the world a showcase for their work. Chantal Joffe was the judge for this event.  Previous judges have been equally big names of the contemporary art world and Barnaby Furnas, Ged Quinn, Wangechi Mutu and Dexter Dalwood have for example run their eyes over entries.

Showdown-Faces-logo_final-2-1024x746

For the first time the works of the 10 Showdown finalists are being shown at the Griffin Gallery, from 5- 20 December with the winner and runner-up receiving art materials to the value of £1000 and £500 respectively – not bad I’d say.

The competition is being run in partnership with Winsor & Newton and is on at the West London Griffin Gallery until 20th December 2013. This is an excellent small show which is a short stroll from Westfield shopping centre – why not take a break from the Christmas shopping and drop in for an artistic break – or a more arty gift? All works are on sale and modestly priced.

For more details about the competition please go to www.saatchionline.com/showdown

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pordenone who? a year of akickupthearts

11 July 2011 § 2 Comments

Amazingly I have now been blogging my way through the London art scene for a whole year now. I thank all those of you – some 20,000 – who have bothered to read my assorted ramblings.

Meanwhile, thanks to the nice people at WordPress, there are all sorts of reports and analyses to discover what the great British public (clearly in this case a notch above the average!) really are interested in.  Which blogs were most read, the search terms you used to find the site and what you had for breakfast? I shall reveal all….

OK, not your breakfasts, but you get my drift – there is an awful lot of analysis available and there are all sorts of statistical traps to tumble in to, the chief one being that any ‘visitor’ analysis reflects what I have actually written about eg: Marc Quinn would not be on the list because I did not write about him. Another problem is that even if I wrote about ‘Picasso’ daily who who click my blog amongst the zillions of Picasso search results?  Treat the ‘charts’ below with caution but you never know they may actually reveal something?

1. Most visited and searched of the year, by a mile, was Pordenone Montenari, an unfortunate recluse who was rocketed in to the news by an Indian fund manager who thought that he could make a quick buck by promoting him as a newly discovered genius – he isn’t (image above).

2. I spent a couple of spare hours compiling a brief list of art-related humorous quotes and jokes. Sadly it trounced many deeply considered blogs of serious critical analysis and was second most searched. Oh well…

3. Amazingly Wolf Vostell came in third. I wrote just one feature about him and commented that he was sadly ignored in the annals of post-war art. Obviously not by many hundreds of you! Exhibition curators take note…

4. Ah, then comes the first contemporary artist – clearly it will be Emin, Hirst or Banksy perhaps? No, it is Eugenie Scrase, the oft- ridiculed winner of TV’s School of Saatchi. Ignore the power of TV at your peril. Worth a flutter if she ever gets a solo gallery show.

5 & 6. Perhaps we shall now get on to some serious art? Nope. Next is Ben Wilson the ‘chewing gum artist’. Well, he is quite interesting. Picasso slips meaninglessly in at 6th before the next half-dozen places. These are taken by contemporary artists of which I have featured literally hundreds, many of them mentioned numerous times. I have covered all the emerging artists championed for example by Saatchi and the top commercial galleries. Are these the ‘cream’ of those featured? Is too little being written about them? Should we take more notice of them in the future?

7. Hannah Wilke – thanks, at least in part, to a great review of the Alison Jacques Gallery exhibition written by Sue Hall.

8. Jacco Olivier. Mesmeric fusing of painting and the moving images at Victoria Miro.

9. Alison Jackson. Hilarious and sometimes disturbing photos that ‘depict our suspicions’. Wry comments on our relationship with celebrity.

10. Wangechi Mutu. Striking paintings and collages referencing cultural identity.

11. Michael Fullerton. A brilliant show at Chisenhale and with work in British Art Now 7, his star is rising fast.

12. Following closely behind was Ida Ekblad, young and inventive Danish multi-media artist.

13. Clare Woods paints the strange, dark world of urban undergrowth.

Following close behind are Littlewhitehead and Toby Ziegler. A little farther back is Damien Hirst – perhaps surprising he’s not higher, but then again he does get rather a lot of column inches written about him.

Littlewhitehead - It Happened in the Corner

Biggest surprise? Perhaps the fact that Tracey Emin is not on the list – or in fact even in the top 50 artists – despite the fact that my Love is What You Want Hayward review appears on the first couple of pages on a Google search and that I have featured her regularly when in contrast eg: Olivier and Ekblad I featured just once. Emin perhaps is not what you want?

So there we have it. After a year of careful and deep intellectual musing on the complexities of the contemporary art scene what you really were most interested in were an Italian recluse and a few jokes. Now where did I hear about that one legged, reclusive, dwarf, artist?

tabaimo at the parasol unit

1 August 2010 § Leave a comment

 

Wangechi Mutu Untitled

 

In preparation for a visit to the Whitechapel Gallery Alice Neel retrospective I dropped in to see In the Company of Alice at the impressive Victoria Miro Gallery (press release: Portraits and figurative paintings by a diverse group of artists. A number of these artists admire or have been inspired by Alice Neel). Having now told you about it I have to break the news that the exhibition closed a few days ago – but do though browse the works via the website. Elizabeth Payton, Yayoi Kusama, Philip Pearlstein, NS Harsha were amongst those shown although, for me, the amazing Wangechi Mutu stole the show.

However, I digress. The Parasol Unit next door to Miro is always well worth a visit when making the hike out to Miro and this was no exception. I had heard of Tabaimo but not seen any work and so I entered the gallery with few preconceptions. Within minutes I was totally captivated and spent over an hour viewing all her entrancing videos in their entirity. Inspired by traditional Japanese drawings and prints they are neverthless totally modern. She comments on modern Japanese life and how her generation attempts to reconcile today’s realities with traditional values. Skilfully hand drawn and cleverly animated, sometimes on multiple walls, her imagery is in turn beautiful, surreal, voyeuristic and often disturbing. Showing until 6 August I highly recommend hurrying down to visit before it closes!

Avoiding any lengthy and largely futile attempts to convey the realities of a Tabaimo video there is one clip as a taster or try youtube for a handful of others (mostly limited in quality!) . I strongly advise trying to get down to see the real thing – good luck!   ,

Tabaimo

 

About Tabaimo. Born 1975 in Hyogo, Tabaimo lives and works in Nagano. She graduated in 1999 from the Kyoto University of Arts and Design. Her graduation work, Japanese Kitchen, an animated video installation, gained first place in the 1999 Kirin Contemporary Award. In 2001, she was the youngest artist to enter the first

Tabaimo hanabi-ra 2003

 

Yokohama Triennale with Japanese Commuter Train. She has been involved in many international exhibitions and group exhibitions, including the 25th Bienal de São Paulo, the 2006 Biennale of Sydney, and the Venice Biennale 2007’s Italian pavilion. She is represented in NY by James Cohan.

If you liked this post please make a comment or like it. If you like the blog please subscribe for regular updates (top right of page). Many thanks! akuta

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