Frieze London 2017

10 October 2017 § Leave a comment

October is the very best time of year to see art in the capital. The city is abuzz with the latest blockbuster shows – 2017 brings Jasper Johns as well as Dali/Duchamp to the Royal Academy, Jean-Michel Basquiat at the Barbican and Rachel Whiteread is showing at the Tate. The commercial galleries have pulled out their biggest names – there are Jean Dubuffet at Pace, Jake & Dinos Chapman at Blain Southern and Anselm Kiefer & Robert Longo at Thaddeus Ropac. Meanwhile all the big names auction houses stage their autumn contemporary sales.

Olafur Eliasson Frieze Art Fair London 2017

Olafur Eliasson

Frieze of course also comes to London, not only with the contemporary focused Frieze Art Fair, but the thriving Frieze Masters event just up the Regents Park footpath. The great and the good of the art world come together with a smattering of celebrity names to see the latest that the art world has to offer.

Matthew Ronay Frieze Art Fair London 2017

Matthew Ronay

Our annual visit to Frieze is always highly anticipated. Not only to admire some great art but to also to discern new trends, see what the big names have on offer admire the most spectacular works – after all this is the biggest fair in the greatest city in the contemporary art world.

Cecily Brown Frieze Art Fair London 2017

Cecily Brown

Yet still, and perhaps because of the anticipation, there is again a tinge of anti-climax. Are we expecting too much or could Frieze do better? Their gallery selection process doesn’t help – preferencing worldwide galleries means we seem to get mediocre work from perhaps Peru or Burkino Fasso at the expense of many excellent local galleries (is this not a London art fair after all?).

Ryan Mosley Frieze Art Fair London

Ryan Mosley

Gone are the bigger artists names and the spectacular and expensive works that graced earlier shows and we now seem to get more mid level and affordable (?) pieces – even from the big name galleries. One is left with the niggling impression that much of the best work is hidden away and that most of the deals are done back at their base.

Cristina Iglesias Frieze Art Fair London

Cristina Iglesias

The curated ‘Sex Work’ exhibition spread through the show failed to stir us and was rather tame. Still, this is the very best contemporary art fair in Britain, there is plenty of good art to be found and new names to be discovered. There is always something to surprise, people to meet and in the end, where else could you for example pick up a free Passport to Antartica?

Billy Childish Frieze Art Fair London

Billy Childish

Amongst our selection of what we noticed at this years fair were: Olafur Eliasson whose colour-shifting balls drew a large crowd whilst Eddie Peake was eye-catching as usual. We loved Ryan Mosley’s newest works, rather more colourful than usual and Mathew Ronay’s curious pastel-coloured and tactile sculptures. On the other hand Jeff Koon’s Glitterball Jesus and Hauser & Wirth’s Bronze Age pseudo museum display failed to inspire.

Eddie Peake Frieze Art Fair London

Eddie Peake

Ai Weiwei Frieze Art Fair London

Ai Weiwei

Kiluandi Kia Henji Frieze Art Fair London

Kiluandi Kia Henji

Anne Hardy Frieze Art Fair London

Anne Hardy

Hauser Wirth Frieze Art Fair London

Hauser & Wirth Bronze Age

Jonathan Gardner Frieze Art Fair London

Jonathan Gardner

Jeff Koons Frieze Art Fair London

Jeff Koons

So, will we go back next year? Of course we will – and we’re looking forward to it already!

akickupthearts were guests of Frieze London

For more information visit www.frieze.com

watch me move – the animation show at the barbican

9 September 2011 § 1 Comment

Just a quick last-minute post to act as a reminder. Anyone who has not yet been to the Barbican for their latest exhibition should get down there sharpish. Closing on Sunday The Animation Show tells the story of animation and demonstrates key themes over time and around the world. It is the perfect place to spend a few hours on a dull or rainy day – which is I might point out is precisely the forecast for the coming weekend – sorry to break the news if you had not yet realised!

Just like the Surrealist Rooms exhibition last year this is beautifully and imaginatively curated. Downstairs wispy grey curtains conceal a carefully planned maze of rooms showing a variety of largely short animations. Upstairs the variety of permanent spaces are put to clever use with sofa – sized pods housing their own sound system allowing a number of projections in close proximity – you may find Starewicz’s Tale of the Fox and Jiri Trnka’s The Hand alongside Snow White for example.

You will find examples of the very earliest animations through to Anime, Svankmaer and the latest in Pixar or art-house films, via all sorts of imaginative offerings from around the world. The exhibition is structured in to themes such as ‘Apparitions’, ‘Characters’, ‘Fables & Fragments’ and ‘Visions’ – a system that works well and allows offerings of all types and eras to be placed together in comparison and contrast.

I expected clips and segments, but in most cases the entire work – two minutes to an hour – are shown in loops whilst. Dip in as you wish or watch the whole thing – I did the latter far too often and regretted not planning a few more hours. A screening room meanwhile shows full movies on a timed programme. My favourite offering was the Brothers Quay film In Absentia (2000) in which animation and live-action are combined to a Stockhausen score – the mere sharpening of a pencil is turned in to a dark and disturbing vision with overtones of Eraserhead and The Shining – amazing. Watch it (legally) here.

Highly recommended but do not even dream of trying to do this show in less than two hours – at least half a day would be ideal.

Watch me Move at The Barbican until 11 September 2011.

tate programme announced for 2011

30 September 2010 § Leave a comment

The key shows for the 2011 have just been announced by the Tate. At Tate Britain Watercolour traces the medium from its beginnings, ‘through to William Blake and JMW Turner, right up to Patrick Heron and Tracey Emin.’ The exhibition starts on the 16 Feb 2011. It is interesting to have a show on an unfairly criticised and oft-neglected medium, but why is Tracey Emin there (again) when her links with watercolour are pretty tenuous and less worthy of examination than many, many other fine artists? Somebody please tell the Tate that we do not need the names of Hirst, Emin et al thrown about in order to draw us to the exhibitions.

The summer 2011 blockbuster is Joan Miró at Tate Modern. apparently the first Miró retrospective in London for over 50 years it opens on the 14 April. I shall look forward to seeing lots of his surrealistic early works, but Miro lived a long life, dying at over 90 years of age, and it will be more fascinating to assess the quality of his later work, usually regarded as inferior. Will the show provide any new insights?

Talking of surrealism Tate Liverpool shows René Magritte from 24 June to 16 October, and following, among others, Paul Nash at Dulwich and the Surreal House at the Barbican it looks like a good run for art from the subconscious. Magritte is a fascinating artist but will a whole show be just one bowler hat too many? Meanwhile how about an exhibition of the rather neglected Max Ernst sometime soon? 

The Autumn arrives with the apocalyptic destruction of John Martin on 21 September 2011, closely followed by a fascinating Gerhard Richter survey at Tate Modern on 6 October 2011. We have hardly been starved of Richter in recent years but a big show will be very welcome and will be certain to cement his position as one of the leading post-war artists.

Overall, not a bad selection and plenty to look forward to, but is it all rather safe and, dare I say ‘old-fashioned’? There are more shows yet to announce but just where are the exciting new artists? Where is the very best and latest in contemporary art? Hopefully in shows yet to be revealed but don’t hold your breath!

Incidentally the images shown above are not necessarily in the exhibitions – although I hope that they are!

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