Frieze London 2017

10 October 2017 § Leave a comment

October is the very best time of year to see art in the capital. The city is abuzz with the latest blockbuster shows – 2017 brings Jasper Johns as well as Dali/Duchamp to the Royal Academy, Jean-Michel Basquiat at the Barbican and Rachel Whiteread is showing at the Tate. The commercial galleries have pulled out their biggest names – there are Jean Dubuffet at Pace, Jake & Dinos Chapman at Blain Southern and Anselm Kiefer & Robert Longo at Thaddeus Ropac. Meanwhile all the big names auction houses stage their autumn contemporary sales.

Olafur Eliasson Frieze Art Fair London 2017

Olafur Eliasson

Frieze of course also comes to London, not only with the contemporary focused Frieze Art Fair, but the thriving Frieze Masters event just up the Regents Park footpath. The great and the good of the art world come together with a smattering of celebrity names to see the latest that the art world has to offer.

Matthew Ronay Frieze Art Fair London 2017

Matthew Ronay

Our annual visit to Frieze is always highly anticipated. Not only to admire some great art but to also to discern new trends, see what the big names have on offer admire the most spectacular works – after all this is the biggest fair in the greatest city in the contemporary art world.

Cecily Brown Frieze Art Fair London 2017

Cecily Brown

Yet still, and perhaps because of the anticipation, there is again a tinge of anti-climax. Are we expecting too much or could Frieze do better? Their gallery selection process doesn’t help – preferencing worldwide galleries means we seem to get mediocre work from perhaps Peru or Burkino Fasso at the expense of many excellent local galleries (is this not a London art fair after all?).

Ryan Mosley Frieze Art Fair London

Ryan Mosley

Gone are the bigger artists names and the spectacular and expensive works that graced earlier shows and we now seem to get more mid level and affordable (?) pieces – even from the big name galleries. One is left with the niggling impression that much of the best work is hidden away and that most of the deals are done back at their base.

Cristina Iglesias Frieze Art Fair London

Cristina Iglesias

The curated ‘Sex Work’ exhibition spread through the show failed to stir us and was rather tame. Still, this is the very best contemporary art fair in Britain, there is plenty of good art to be found and new names to be discovered. There is always something to surprise, people to meet and in the end, where else could you for example pick up a free Passport to Antartica?

Billy Childish Frieze Art Fair London

Billy Childish

Amongst our selection of what we noticed at this years fair were: Olafur Eliasson whose colour-shifting balls drew a large crowd whilst Eddie Peake was eye-catching as usual. We loved Ryan Mosley’s newest works, rather more colourful than usual and Mathew Ronay’s curious pastel-coloured and tactile sculptures. On the other hand Jeff Koon’s Glitterball Jesus and Hauser & Wirth’s Bronze Age pseudo museum display failed to inspire.

Eddie Peake Frieze Art Fair London

Eddie Peake

Ai Weiwei Frieze Art Fair London

Ai Weiwei

Kiluandi Kia Henji Frieze Art Fair London

Kiluandi Kia Henji

Anne Hardy Frieze Art Fair London

Anne Hardy

Hauser Wirth Frieze Art Fair London

Hauser & Wirth Bronze Age

Jonathan Gardner Frieze Art Fair London

Jonathan Gardner

Jeff Koons Frieze Art Fair London

Jeff Koons

So, will we go back next year? Of course we will – and we’re looking forward to it already!

akickupthearts were guests of Frieze London

For more information visit www.frieze.com

Frieze London

18 November 2015 § Leave a comment

The preview day of Frieze always provides plenty of visual stimulation – both on and off the exhibiting gallery walls. As we shimmied past the likes of Benedict Cumberbatch, Tom Hooper, Tommy Hilfiger and Valentino we made our way around the fair to see what was on offer this year.

Frieze London by reviewed by www.cellophaneland.com
 Most of of the big name international names were in attendance, amongst a grand total of 164 galleries that represented over 1000 artists from 27 countries. There actually seemed to be a lack of big name artist ‘blockbuster’ pieces at this years fair but there was still plenty to catch the eye in an event that is one of the annual highlights of the art world.

Frieze London by reviewed by www.cellophaneland.com
Frieze London by reviewed by www.cellophaneland.com

Glenn Brown was our undisputed favourite this year with a stand full of great pieces at Gagosian, including these examples of both oil and sculpture.

Frieze London by reviewed by www.cellophaneland.com

The young sensation Eddie Peake had two stunning works on show.

Frieze London by reviewed by www.cellophaneland.comThere were two superb Michael Fullerton portraits showing at the Carl Freedman Gallery.

Frieze London by reviewed by www.cellophaneland.com

The underrated Billy Childish had a large scale work, also at Carl Freedman.

Frieze London by reviewed by www.cellophaneland.com

A colourful large scale Allen Jones was a great example of his work.

Frieze London by reviewed by www.cellophaneland.com

Ai Weiwei has been dying his roots.

Frieze London by reviewed by www.cellophaneland.com

Self Portrait in bath by Tracey Emin underwhelmed us, but here are some others that drew our attention:

photo 2 copy 4IMG_6014photo 2 copy 6 photo 1 copy 7 photo 3 copy 3photo 3 copyphoto 5Frieze London by reviewed by www.cellophaneland.com

Frieze London runs until Saturday 17 October 2015. For more information visit www. friezelondon.com

For more information visit www. friezemasters.com

Images by CELLOPHANELAND* and courtesy of Frieze

William Kentridge at Marian Goodman London

12 November 2015 § Leave a comment

People fleeing from hunger, war and political oppression have always been a staple of the daily news and with the current European crisis refugees are again in the headlines. With Ai Weiwei also now in the media with his latest show at the RA (reviewed here) it seems a particularly  apt time to be dipping in to the politically-charged world of William Kentridge.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

At the heart of Kentridge’s first solo presentation in London for fifteen years is a new multi-screen film installation entitled More Sweetly Play the Dance. This substantial exhibition also includes another film, monumental ink-on-paper paintings, sculptures and drawings.

William Kentridge More Sweetly Play The Dance Marian Goodman

This new work is a 45-metre-long frieze that depicts a seemingly endless parade of figures. A combination of dance, shadow puppetry, ballet, theatre, film, and music it features a procession of people, largely in silhouette, moving around us from screen to screen against a bare and evocative landscape, drawn by Kentridge in charcoal.

William Kentridge More Sweetly Play The Dance Marian Goodman

Made using a unique technique which he has called “poor-man’s animation” it involves working on a single piece of paper in charcoal making an expressive drawing before erasing, adding new elements and erasing again. He then animates the images into a mesmeric whole.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

It is a sublime work from an artist at his peak. One moment it appears as a political rally or a stream of refugees, at another a funereal cortege. Figures variously carry flags, play instruments, parade with shadow heads. One figure drags a body whilst another wheels a hospital drip.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

Some wear military caps, some are in rags. An animated pair of scissors jerks its way around the screen and skeletons dance. It is bizarre, witty, sad, macabre and yet somehow uplifting. The whole is accompanied by a magical accordion and brass band accompaniment reminiscent of New Orleans Jazz funerals.

William Kentridge More Sweetly Play The Dance Marian Goodman

This is Mao’s China, communist Russia, black Africa, the Balkans, post-war Europe and todays Middle East all rolled in to one. The casualties of hunger and war, streams of displaced people, human misery in one tragic everlasting parade.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

Born in South Africa to parents who were both anti-apartheid lawyers, his father defending Nelson Mandela among others, Kentridge’s studies inevitably took in politics before including art, film and theatre. Although primarily an artist all these influences are deeply imbedded in his work.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

Another film installation, based on Mao’s model operas, features an African ballet dancer, file in hand, in front of changing  notebooks, maps and images of famine and poverty – cleverly highlighting political posturing as populations suffer.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

The main gallery downstairs has a new series of works in which political dictums are interwoven throughout giant ink images of flowers drawn on pages of found political text.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

Smaller works on paper span two walls including a sequence of doves flying across a sky of Chinese calligraphy. An adjacent room contains two groups of painted bronze heads that developed through research for Kentridge’s production of Alban Berg’s opera ‘Lulu’.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

To coincide with this show the play ‘Ubu and the Truth Commission’ is on at the Coronet London. Both surely are amongst the do-not-miss highlights of the year.

William Kentridge More Sweetly Play The Dance at Marian Goodman runs until 24 October 2015. For more information visit www.mariangoodman.com

‘Ubu and the Truth Commission’, by William Kentridge, opens at The Coronet on 15 October 2014 for a 3 week season. For more information visit www.the-print-room.org

Images by CELLOPHANELAND* and Marian Goodman Gallery.

Ai Weiwei at the Royal Academy, London

10 November 2015 § Leave a comment

The notorious Chinese dissident artist has clearly been very busy since his recent, and not insubstantial, exhibition at Blenheim Palace (reviewed here). His latest outing is at the Royal Academy where a survey of works from 1993 to the present day make up his first major institutional exhibition in the UK.

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

Blenheim provided an excellent historical foil for his anti-establishment works: the richly decorative interior a natural target for pieces that attack state control, and bourgeois ideals. At the RA Ai is more isolated, his pieces needing to succeed both individually, and as a cohesive body of work. Unfortunately this is not quite the case – his rather blunt methodology sometimes left exposed in is an exhibition that is fortunately however more hit than miss.

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

The largest new work on show here is Straight (2018-12), which fills the largest of the halls. Thousands of rebar concrete reinforcement rods were secretly purchased from the recycled rubble of the Sichuan earthquake, straightened and arranged in an undulating and split metal sculpture that occupies the central area.

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

The structure represents the undulations and cracking of the earthquake, although it is not particularly clear, works as a fitting memorial for the thousands that lost their lives in the disaster, many of them children who died in the poorly constructed concrete buildings, compromised by the corrupt officialdom. A moving film looks at the disaster whilst victims names meanwhile line one of the walls.

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

In another room, an impressive many-arched structure is built from wooden fragments of destroyed temples, the whole apparently shaped like a map of China if viewed from above. In Bed (2004), a beautifully made sculpture of dark iron wood bears a 3D profile of the country and its borders. As do the ridges and grooves of a set of round, wall-mounted aluminium frames.

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

Coloured Vases (2015) collects together a range of valuable vessels aged from the Neolithic to Qing Dynasty, dipped in paint in a work about authenticity and value. Better are the three photographs hung behind, entitled Dropping a Hang Dynasty Urn (1995), which attack the Chinese authorities destruction of historic buildings and objects. Both works however do have the morally ambiguous quality of destroying historically valuable pieces to make their point – because Ai the artist is the destroyer does that somehow make it better?

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

Four one metre cubes crafted from a variety of materials neatly echo Robert Morris’ minimalist mirrored cubes, but for little good reason, whilst I also wonder why an exquisitely carved marble pram sits in a bed of marble grass. The huge and impressive crystal chandelier incorporating bicycle frames is another strange hanging sculpture that seems to exist only  for the incorporation of the bicycle, symbolic of ‘old China’.

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

The last of the main galleries revisits Ai’s ordeals at the hands of the Chinese authorities who held him in a tiny cell, and subjected him to various physical and mental tortures. Six half scale metal boxes recreate the cell in minute detail and incorporate Ai and his guards in various scenarios.

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

It is an intense and fascinating reminder of what the artist was subjected to, and a statement of how far he has come and how much he had to endure.

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

We should be grateful but it is nevertheless rather unfortunate that it is somewhat reminiscent of historic tableaux in a regional museum. Ultimately he has of course to be forgiven – we have to recognise his artistic and physical battle against what we must not forget has been one of the worlds most unforgiving and authoritarian regimes.

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

Much less forgiveable is the RA’s decision to crowdfund the installation of the monumental, and excellent, Tree sculptures that fill the courtyard. Some £123,000 was raised for their transport and installation, which surely this hugely profitable show should be providing? Is it not ironic that the RA have cynically manipulated the British public in a similar, albeit less oppressive, way that past Chinese governments have exploited theirs?

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

Despite our misgivings this is a show that is sure to be a crowd-pleaser; big on spectacle, it is worth seeing for the best works and a timely reminder that art must continue to fight against all political corruption, tyranny and oppression.

Ai Weiwei Royal Academy

Ai Weiwei The Royal Academy of Art runs until 13 December 2015

For more information visit www.royalacademy.org.uk

William Kentridge at Marian Goodman London

11 October 2015 § Leave a comment

People fleeing from hunger, war and political oppression have always been a staple of the daily news and with the current European crisis refugees are again in the headlines. With Ai Weiwei also now in the media with his latest show at the RA (reviewed here) it seems a particularly  apt time to be dipping in to the politically-charged world of William Kentridge.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

At the heart of Kentridge’s first solo presentation in London for fifteen years is a new multi-screen film installation entitled More Sweetly Play the Dance. This substantial exhibition also includes another film, monumental ink-on-paper paintings, sculptures and drawings.

William Kentridge More Sweetly Play The Dance Marian Goodman

This new work is a 45-metre-long frieze that depicts a seemingly endless parade of figures. A combination of dance, shadow puppetry, ballet, theatre, film, and music it features a procession of people, largely in silhouette, moving around us from screen to screen against a bare and evocative landscape, drawn by Kentridge in charcoal.

William Kentridge More Sweetly Play The Dance Marian Goodman

Made using a unique technique which he has called “poor-man’s animation” it involves working on a single piece of paper in charcoal making an expressive drawing before erasing, adding new elements and erasing again. He then animates the images into a mesmeric whole.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

It is a sublime work from an artist at his peak. One moment it appears as a political rally or a stream of refugees, at another a funereal cortege. Figures variously carry flags, play instruments, parade with shadow heads. One figure drags a body whilst another wheels a hospital drip.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

Some wear military caps, some are in rags. An animated pair of scissors jerks its way around the screen and skeletons dance. It is bizarre, witty, sad, macabre and yet somehow uplifting. The whole is accompanied by a magical accordion and brass band accompaniment reminiscent of New Orleans Jazz funerals.

William Kentridge More Sweetly Play The Dance Marian Goodman

This is Mao’s China, communist Russia, black Africa, the Balkans, post-war Europe and todays Middle East all rolled in to one. The casualties of hunger and war, streams of displaced people, human misery in one tragic everlasting parade.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

Born in South Africa to parents who were both anti-apartheid lawyers, his father defending Nelson Mandela among others, Kentridge’s studies inevitably took in politics before including art, film and theatre. Although primarily an artist all these influences are deeply imbedded in his work.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

Another film installation, based on Mao’s model operas, features an African ballet dancer, file in hand, in front of changing  notebooks, maps and images of famine and poverty – cleverly highlighting political posturing as populations suffer.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

The main gallery downstairs has a new series of works in which political dictums are interwoven throughout giant ink images of flowers drawn on pages of found political text.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

Smaller works on paper span two walls including a sequence of doves flying across a sky of Chinese calligraphy. An adjacent room contains two groups of painted bronze heads that developed through research for Kentridge’s production of Alban Berg’s opera ‘Lulu’.

William Kentridge More Sweetly lay The Dance Marian Goodman Gallery

To coincide with this show the play ‘Ubu and the Truth Commission’ is on at the Coronet London. Both surely are amongst the do-not-miss highlights of the year.

William Kentridge More Sweetly Play The Dance at Marian Goodman runs until 24 October 2015. For more information visit www.mariangoodman.com

‘Ubu and the Truth Commission’, by William Kentridge, opens at The Coronet on 15 October 2014 for a 3 week season. For more information visit www.the-print-room.org

Images by CELLOPHANELAND* and Marian Goodman Gallery.

The Venice Biennale 2013 – The Encyclopaedic Palace

11 November 2013 § 2 Comments

Most reviews of the Venice Biennale are posted soon after its opening in June/July. This is all very well for those writers who enjoy being in a sweaty summertime Venice thronged with tourists and queueing with the crowds to gain access to the most interesting pavilions. True, there are some exhibitions that only ‘pop-up’ for the first month or so of the biennale and naturally all the sleb-studded parties also only happen around opening time but on the whole it is a time I avoid like the plague.

Jeremy Deller

Jeremy Deller

I prefer to let the hubbub settle down and visit later in the year. With the end of the 2013 Biennale on the 24 November there is a big window of opportunity for take a trip during a quieter period when not only is the weather less hot and humid but there are fewer tourists, hotel prices are lower and tables are available at the best Osterias.

Last but not least of course you can take advantage of the prior reviews to plan visits to the best pavilions whilst avoiding the (too-frequent) time-wasting exhibitions in multitudinous back-alleys that you have just walked in circles for 30 minutes trying to find.

Jeremy Deller

Jeremy Deller

In the official Biennale there are, as usual, a plethora of dud pavilions. Surprisingly these include giants like Germany with an OK installation with a maze of interlocking stools by Ai Weiwei and little else, France with Anri Sala pointlessly punning on Ravel/Unravel – geddit? – and the USA where Sarah Sze has filled the pavilion with a student-like mess of bits and pieces.

Bill Culbert

Bill Culbert

Japan had chosen a very neat display of conceptual work from Koki Tanaka featuring collective tasks and collaborative acts in order to examine a new post-tsunami Japanese reality. For example groups of five musicians, writers or potters were asked to create a work together, the process being filmed whils other projects, reminiscent of sixties Ono & Fluxus were perhaps ‘Precarious Tasks #3 Walk from city to its suburbs’.

Koki Tanaka - A piano played by five pianists at once

Koki Tanaka – A piano played by five pianists at once

Vadim Zakharov’s brilliant Russian pavilion has a besuited businessman perched on a high rafter throwing peanut husks upon the public below whilst in the adjacent room gold coins are showered upon the ladies (only!) below who prolong the golden shower by collecting the coins in to a bucket which is raised – by another suited gent – and emptied on to a conveyor belt. A perpetual cycle of greed and exploitation is completed by the willing participants.Russian Pavilion

Jeremy Deller however has stolen the Giardini ‘show’ with ‘English Magic’. He cleverly weaves together truly diverse aspects of British society to create a witty and topical vision of one version of a national mythology. Amongst a number of threads Prince Harry’s appalling shooting of two rare hen harriers is revisited with a giant bird carrying off a passing Land Rover whilst Abramovich’s obscene yacht is cast in to the Venetian lagoon by Willaim Morris. There is of course a Deller trademark tea room – the ‘TEA’ spelt out in palaeolithic arrowheads – seeming much more relevant in an international location where it’s Britishness is self-evident.

Walter de a Maria

Walter de a Maria

The central Giardini pavilion and the Arsenale meanwhile I found to be rather a mess. The attempt to illustrate the thematic Encyclopaedic Palace  coming a cropper with a confusion of self-taught and outsider artists alongside more conventional names – big and small.

Iraqi Pavilion

Iraqi Pavilion

Elsewhere around town the exhibits from Iraq, Ireland & Cyprus, Wales, Lithuania and Angola stand out from the multitude. Rudolph Stingel is worth seeing at the Palazzo Grassi where he has carpeted almost every inch of the walls and floor with oriental rugs. Buy a twin ticket for the other Pinault exhibition at the Punta della Dogana. The wonderland of the Palazzo Fortuny is always worth a visit – this time with an Anton Tapies exhibition.

Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel

There is much more of course whilst watching over the whole event from its waterfront perch on the island of San Giorgio Maggiore is the giant pink inflatable sculpture Alison Lapper Pregnant by Marc Quinn. Eye-catching and impressive.

Marc Quinn Alison Lapper Pregnant

Marc Quinn Alison Lapper Pregnant

release ai weiwei

8 April 2011 § 5 Comments

We all know that the cowardly authorities in China have again attempted to silence the artist Ai Weiwei. The Tate, who recently showed Weiwei’s installation Sunflower seeds in the Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern, have now displayed their support by posting a statement on the roof of the gallery (see image).

Alongside this welcome sign of solidarity they have a petition which seeks to reach a million signatures. Whatever else you do please click here NOW to sign and show your support!!

Send this link to your friends and add a link on facebook!

london galleries autumn preview

17 August 2010 § Leave a comment

The mid-summer lull in the London gallery schedules allows a moment for contemplation on what looks like a very mixed bag of Autumn shows. I just cannot quite work myself up in to a frenzy of excitment about this motley assortment of old hands and uninspiring newcomers.

Starting with public galleries the blockbuster Gaugin will undoubtedly be the major event of 2010 and amazingly his first major UK exhibition for 5o years.  The Tate Modern promises that the exhibition will explore ‘the role of the myths around the man.’ Starts 30 September – stick it in the diary! Arrive after the 12 October and see what Ai Weiwei has installed as the 11th Turbine Hall commission. Recently involved in the Beijing Olympic stadium and then almost beaten to death for his political views he has said: ‘Everything is art, everything is politics. You can call it art or you can call it politics, I don’t give a damn.’ Should be interesting. 

Over at Tate Britain the schedule, starting 8 September, is totally underwhelming. Eadweard Muybridge (yes, correctly spelt) was a the 19th century photographer who ‘proved that a horse can fly’ with multiple images and anticipated the coming of cinema with the zoopraxiscope. He also travelled and documented America of the time. Just about worth dropping in. 

Rachel Whiteread Drawings is the other choice – but why? Her casts of varied spaces, apart from being a direct steal from Bruce Nauman are getting tedious. Now she says this:  ‘A lot of the works that I’ve been making over the years have been part of a cyclical process. I often feel a cycle is incomplete and need to tread the same path again.’ So now having run out of (someone else’s) ideas all she can do is more of the same again, but this time in drawings. Keep well away! The Gagosian, Daniels Street, is taking advantage with their own Rachel Whiteread exhibition on the 7 September – and I don’t see any reason to bother with this one either.  

The Turner Prize 2010 exhibition is of course at Tate Britain too – from 5 October. Calming down in its old age but an interesting selection. Dexter Dalwood and Angela de la Cruz painting, sound artist Susan Philipsz and the multi-disciplinary Otolith Group. I like Dalwood but the inventive Otolith Group have to be my favourite.

The second part of Newspeak: British Art Now opens at the Satchi on 27 October. Despite the overwhelming mediocrity of the show it is strangely compulsive viewing, and there is a particularly nice cafe. Apart from that I can not wait to update my critics Saatchi league table from my previous posts

Egon Schiele

The Royal Academy’s Treasures of Budapest starts on 25 September. Although there will be the opportunity to save the air fare to Budapest it doesn’t seem to be a show-stopper, but worth a visit. It promises Raphael, El Greco, Manet, Monet, Schiele and Picasso amongst others. 

And now for something completely different? How about the Barbican with Future Fashion: 30 years of Japanese Fashion. Not ‘art’ but could be spectacular. 

Of the smaller Galleries the Camden Arts Centre always seems to have something interesting. On 23 September Rene Daniels’ opens. His interesting work is ‘permeated through and through with writing, word games, literary references, visual puns, and allusions to art movements, institutions, and mass media.’ 

Of the private galleries Hauser & Wirth’s opens its expansive new Savile Row space on the 15 October with a Fabric Works of Louise Bourgeois – hardly inspirational, but I look forward to seeing the gallery. Of their other exhibitions the Piccadilly branch has the first posthumous show of Jason Rhoades’ opening 24 September. The exhibition features ’1:12 Perfect World’, Rhoades’ scale model of his groundbreaking 1999 exhibition, ‘Perfect World’ in Hamburg. Ho-hum. 

At Haunch of Venison there is the strange choice of Loud Flash: British Punk on Paper, starting 24 September, which nevertheless looks like it may be quite interesting. Meanwhile do not miss the excellent Joana Vasconcelos and quirky animal-stuffer Polly Morgan whose exhibitions are currently on until the 25 September! 

At the White Cube, Masons yard Christian Marclay opens on the 15 October: ‘Over the past 30 years, Christian Marclay has explored the fusion of fine art and audio cultures, transforming sounds and music into a visible, physical form through performance, collage, sculpture, installation, photography and video.’ Meanwhile over at WC Hoxton on 13 October Mark Bradford’s ‘multi-layered collaged paintings incorporating materials found in the urban environment’. Both may be worth a look but hardly captivating.  

 

Jacco Olivier

The pick of the rest are Jacco Olivier at Victoria Miro from 7 September – Olivier fuses colourful paintings with video – his works are delightful and fascinating. Finally Marina Abramovic is at the Lisson – god knows what we will see from the ‘grandmother of performance art’ but it is well worth a detour! 

There we go – the best of the autumn? Not great and, in respect of painting very lop-sided. The public galleries mostly with retrospective painting, the private with, well all sorts from taxidermy to performance but pretty much steering away from anything on canvas . No demand? No talent? Are the private galleries out of sync with what the public wants – or is it the Public galleries? I will leave you to ponder the mystery…. 
If you liked this post please make a comment or like it. If you like the blog please subscribe for regular updates (top right of page). Many thanks! akuta 

 

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